Porn star says she was BANNED from Bumble because of her adult film work – as she slams female-led dating app for discriminating against sex workers

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An adult film actress has claimed that she was kicked off female-centric dating app Bumble because she works in porn. 

Bunny Colby, 28, who is based in Los Angeles, contacted Bumble customer service when she opened the app and saw that she had been banned for allegedly engaging in ‘commercial activity’ — which she denies she had done.  

Despite her protests, Bumble refused to reinstate her account — and now Colby has spoken out about the alleged discrimination to the Daily Beast, insisting that sex workers want love just like anybody else.

Bunny, who has starred in several porn films and been nominated for AVN Awards, joined Bumble during the pandemic. 

Screengrabs obtained by the Daily Beast show a ‘tame’ profile and a bio that read: ‘Cat lady. Internet person. Nice people only.’  

She also included her Instagram handle, which many other users do.

But a few months ago, she couldn’t access her account, with a notification on her screen claiming that she was engaging in ‘commercial activity’ on the app and had been permanently banned.

She insists, though, that she wasn’t using the app to find or promote her work, or to make money in any way — she just wanted to meet someone. 

Confused, Colby sent a message to @BumbleSupport on Twitter, asking why she was banned.

At first, she was told it had been an accident, and the ban was lifted from her account. 

‘Unfortunately, the person you spoke with yesterday made a mistake,’ the response read. 

‘We’re unable to make an exception to allow you back onto the platform. You’ve indeed been permanently banned for commercial activity. I’m sorry; I know this isn’t the outcome you were hoping for, but we have to adhere to our community guidelines.’

When Colby asked the customer support person to specify what ‘commercial activity’ she was ‘supposedly’ engaging in, they suggested she was trying to earn money on the app.

Bumble wrote: ‘Unfortunately, we can’t share specifics, but generally speaking commercial activity includes, but is not limited to seeking financial support, transactional activity, recruiting or soliciting for adult entertainment, selling/promoting any goods or services, or sharing links to any subscription-based services such as OnlyFans, ManyVids, Patreon, etc.’ 

‘I have done none of this,’ Colby replied. ‘At most I ever had an @ for Insta in my bio but I didn’t even tell people to follow or message there or anything that would suggest promoting it.

‘You are targeting sex workers unfairly even when they adhere to your TOS,’ she added.

Speaking to the Daily Beast, Colby insisted once again that she is not using Bumble to make money, find work, or promote a paid service like OnlyFans — she just wants to meet someone, like everyone else on the app.

She said this can be true for porn actress likes her as well as people in other kinds of sex work, like prostitution. 

‘The assumption that even a full-service sex worker would be on that app just to do sex work is wrong. Those people can also want authentic relationships, which is what Bumble says it exists for,’ she said. 

Though Tinder and Grindr have also both been accused of banning adult film stars, Colby finds it especially hypocritical that Bumble would do so when it bills itself as a feminist dating app.

She said that this is just another way that those who work in the sex industry are discriminated against.

‘Now you’re being further alienated by these apps when you try to make connections with people,’ she said. ‘I wasn’t planning an insurrection or anything. I was just swiping left and right, hoping that I don’t die alone.’

Earlier this year, Los Angeles-based Playboy model Tahlia Paris, 24, made her own claims against Bumble — only she says the app is discriminating against her because she ‘is too beautiful’. 

She insisted that she created a ‘PG’ profile that made her look like an ‘average girl,’ posing snaps of herself pulling funny faces and strolling down the beach.

But instead of date requests, Tahlia claims she received a notification that Bumble moderators had removed some of her profile images.

Tahlia, who has 890,000 followers on Instagram and runs a popular OnlyFans account, believes it’s because she is ‘too hot’ for the dating app. 

She claims three photos were removed: one of her in a bikini on the beach, one of her playing Pac Man in a bikini top, and one red carpet snap. The bikini photo was later reinstated by Bumble, according to Tahlia.

‘I tried to keep it very PG and not model-esque at all. I wanted guys to not stop at my profile because I’m a professional model but because I was just another average girl looking to date.’ 

The company said in a statement that profiles cannot include ‘shirtless bathroom mirror selfies’ or photos of people wearing ‘underwear or swimsuits’ indoors.   

Bumble has made headlines for several policy decisions recently, including a ban on body-shaming added to its terms of service.

The defines body-shaming as ‘unsolicited and derogatory comments about someone’s appearance, body shape, size, or health.’

The ban includes any language deemed ‘fat-phobic, racist, colorist, homophobic, or transphobic,’ according to Bumble.

A team of Bumble moderators will be looking out for any offenders who post body-shaming content on either their profile or through the app’s chat function. They will also be working to identify any type of negative language such as ‘discouraging particular people to interact with somebody’s profile.’   

And in December, the app announced that it would no longer allow ‘photos in bikinis/swimwear indoors.’

‘Bikinis and swimwear pics are only okay if you are outdoors; for example, in a pool or at the beach. But if you’re indoors, that’s a no-no, since it looks too much like underwear,’ the app explained.

‘On that note, no pictures in your underwear either. And men, no shirtless photos — unless you’re at the beach. Why? Consider this restaurant analogy. You wouldn’t necessarily want to meet or approach someone in a restaurant in your (or their) underwear. You want a user’s consent to send that kind of content. It’s just bad manners to jump to such conclusions.’

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